Monuments Person Badge:
Ever since I was a young girl I've been fascinated by the Japanese culture. It all started with picking up a book of Japanese manga at my middle school library, and from there I fell head first into a culture that was so radically different (and yet so beautiful) from my own. Since then I've done tons of personal research about Japanese history, culture, and language to learn more about their traditions: eating customs, festivals, shinto shrines, colloquial sayings. In short, over the years my burning interest turned into a deep desire to know all that I can about this culture. To this day, it is my dream to go to Japan and teach children English.
Coming at length to the badge requirements, when I read the requirements for this badge I had a hard time thinking about what artifact could be so important to me that I wouldn't hesitate to throw my life away over it. I could think of plenty of monuments important to my religion, but I'm more skeptical of the artifacts/relics just because there were so many fake ones during the medieval times, certainly nothing I could be sure was worth sacrificing my life for. That's when I tried to think of something else, perhaps something that went outside of my religion. I suppose I could have selected some artifact from ancient Egypt or Greece, those things felt important to me. But then I realized belatedly that Japan had many cultural artifacts, a lot of them existing in the historical city Kyoto. The Shinto shrine I've depicted below is only one of many that dot the region of Japan. Shintoism is an ancient religion originating in Japan which focuses on the belief that spirits are every where, especially manifesting in forces of nature. These shrines offer worshipers the opportunity to pay homage to those spirits so that the two worlds can try to live in harmony. Today, a mixture of Shintoism and Buddhism make up the core beliefs of Japan, but small shrines like these still represent the ancient traditions that are still firmly rooted in modern-day Japanese culture. If there were a group of individuals who made it their mission to go to Kyoto and destroy these small shrines I could see myself being willing to get in harms way to protect them. Even though the history, culture and language isn't my own, and even though I'm still an outsider who doesn't understand Japanese culture, it's still important enough to me to want to protect artifact like this.
shinto shrine kyoto.jpg

Origins Badge:

genesis.jpgThe garden of Eden, found in Genesis.
castration of uranus.jpgThe castration of Uranus, from Hediod's Theogony.
marduk vs taimat.png
Marduk vs. Tiamat in the Babylonian The Epic of Creation.

Even though these stories are very different, coming from different eras and with different casts of characters, they share some similarities. For starters, they're all myths that seek to explain the creation of the world and humans' role in the seemingly chaotic happenings on earth (floods, storms, earth quakes, etc.). But that much is obvious. In what other ways do these tales share similar qualities? All three of these stories feature some sort of conflict that happened between divine powers which explain why the earth is no longer a walking-ground for gods and other supernatural creatures. In the example of Genesis, all of god creatures (beasts and supernatural beings alike) walked freely in the garden. Once Adam and Eve ate the fruit of knowledge of good and evil, they were banished from the garden and the doors were closed forever to humans so they couldn't see the imps and nymphs inside. In concerns to The Epic of Creation, Tiamat made an army of despicable looking monsters and gods to fight in the battle against Marduk. Once Marduk won the battle he "tied them up and smashed their weapons./ They were thrown into the net and sat there ensnared./...they had to bear his punishment, confined to prison" (105-8). And in Theogony, Uranus (or Ouranos) takes "these most awful sons of Earth and Heaven" and "hid/ The child in a secret hiding-place in the Earth/ And would not let it come to see the light" (46-50).
Another thing they all have in common is strife happening with or between gods. With Genesis, Adam and Eve went against God's orders; In The Epic of Creation Tiamat and Marduk fought in a struggle for dominance; and in Theogony Uranus' son castrated him for requital for how he'd treated his children.

Now let's discuss where they're different: Even though there is conflict present in these stories, the conflict is not always the reason that the Earth is created. It happens to be this way in The Epic of Creation, in which the Earth is shaped from Tiamat's carcass. But Genesis presents a different alternative, saying that God constructed the world in a seven day process without any conflict. This also doesn't happen in Hesiod's Theogony because the Earth goddess Gaia creates the earth and the waters and the heavens all on her own. In this sense, not all of the stories claim that the existence of the Earth is owed to a male entity. Genesis and The Epic of Creation have this with their focus on God and Marduk respectively. But Theonogy again assigns credit to the Earth's creation to the Goddess Gaia.

Their thoughts transcend the everyday, mundane tasks of man, often branching into a category of philosophy.?At the same time, a wise person should share those thoughts with his or her fellow man, because if they don't share their
wise thoughts how would any one ever know that they are wise?Their ideas challenge the norm, often going against common ways of thinking.They need to have life experience. In other words, I think for a person to be considered 'wise' they have to have
experienced pain, loss, suffering, responsibility, being insulted or harmed and things of that nature as well as happiness.
So anyone who hasn't experienced all those things, to me, can't be wise because they can't wake well-rounded judgments
about how life is if they know nothing about the other, less pleasant half of it. (Note, this does not exclude young
people. Children can go through all of those things and be wise, and so too can teenagers. The difference isn't age, but
rather experience.)Something also must be said about the character of a wise person. A wise person can't be demeaning towards other people,
but instead be open minded and be aware of differences in opinion. A wise person has their actions that go along with their words. Some people like to preach about the way things need to be
done, or how things should be run instead to make things better for everyone. But if then that person doesn't live up to
what they claim are the proper terms for conduct, that person goes from being wise to a hypocrite. Think of Henry David
Thoreau, who had his opposing views about society and was said "this is the way a man ought to be living", and then he put
his money where his mouth was, went out and lived that way.A wise person is someone who respects life and forms of life. They understand what acts constitute as "wickedness" and
admonish their fellows against such acts.A wise person has patience, and understands that simply because things are obvious to them they might not be as obvious to
others.A wise person must show restraint. They know which battles are worth fighting and when they do choose to engaging in
argumentation they're not quick to get angry because they would know that differences in ideas and arguing is just an
opportunity to view a subject from a different perspective, and shouldn't be counted as an insult against their character.Finally, a wise person will never think that they know the answer to everything. They would be the last persons to call
themselves wise because they know that there is always something to be learned.One wise person that I like who fits in with these characteristics is Confucius. One of my favorite quote from his
teachings is his opinion about education: "He who learns but does not think, is lost. He who thinks but does not learn is
in great danger".
Some excellent examples of wise (wo)men include:
Obi-wan Kenobi (Episodes IV, V and VI): Obi wan is wise because he understands the intellectual, mystic realm of the force
and how to use its mysterious power. He also is patient went teaching Luke, and the fact that he has taken on pupils shows
that he is willing to share what he has learned. He's also gone through many hardships (that I assume have happened in the
first three episodes, I never got around to watching them), and isn't quick to anger or fear. Obi wan knows when to play a
jedi mind trick on Empirial guards and when to fight people off physically.Jesus: Jesus is wise because he shared his thoughts about the love of God and the love people should have for each other,
there by wanting to improve people's lives by giving moral advice about how to conduct oneself. Despite some of the
disagreeable things Jesus witnessed (such as the almost-stoning of Mary Magdalene) he used words and arguments (not
violence) to persuade people to see how their behaviors were wrong. Jesus practiced what he preached and was only moved to
extreme anger one time when people made a market inside a temple and were gambling on the Sabbath.Socrates: Socrates was wise because he had thoughts that transcended the everyday thoughts of regular people. He argued for
his ideas and maintained them as correct even with the steep resistance he met from his peers.Buddha: Buddha can be considered wise because not only did he practice what he preached but he also turned down entering
Nirvana so that he could stay behind and help other people reach enlightenment. Such a self sacrifice on behalf of the
well-being for his fellow man to me makes Buddha very wise and compassionate. Buddha also had great patience when dealing
with his pupils.Tony Clarke - The man who saved "The Resurrection": I believe this man to possess wisdom (if only to a very shallow degree)
because he had the foresight to see the importance of this work of art to a culture and know that importance meant more to
the world than his own life. Him having the courage to follow through with what was right makes him wise in that sense.Confucius: As I've stated before, I find Confucius to be a wise person. In reference to the quotation I selected above,
Confucius is sharing his intellectual thoughts with his fellows so that he can give them advice about how to improve their
lives. Confucius also follows/lives by his own advice by setting an example of being a thinker that reflects on what he's
learned.The Alchemist - Paulo Coelho: In his novel ?The Alchemist? the character named Santiago goes out searching for a great
treasure, and along the way learns about his place in the universe. During his stay in an oasis city, Santiago searches for
a man who is simply called the alchemist. Santiago eventually meets him and the alchemist is very wise. He is in tune with
the energy connecting all living things and can tune in to that energy to see visions of the future and read the intentions
of other people. He teaches Santiago his ways and once he feels that Santiago has learned enough he sends him on his way.Prospero - Shakespeare's Tempest: Prospero is a wise person because not only is he very educated, but even though he had
misgivings about the way Alonso and Antonio usurped him out of his dukedom in Milan, he still doesn't let his anger sway
him to retaliate violently when they shipwreck on to his island. And he also doesn't let his personal feelings get in the
way of Ferdinand and Meranda's love for each other. Being smart, knowing which battles to choose, and not being hasty to
violence make a person wise. Muhammad: Muhammad is wise because he had intellectual thoughts that he shared with his fellow man to help them live a
moral and meaningful life.Maurie Schwartz - Tuesdays with Maurie?: I think Maurie is wise because he's had enough experiences that are bad as well as
good ones. Towards the end of his life he did a lot of reflecting and had time to think about what events should really be
meaningful to a person, and walked people through his experience of dying so that those who face that last challenge (as we
all inevitably will) know that they aren't alone and give them hope. In this way, Maurie's willingness to share what he's
learned, his life experiences, and his understanding that he isn't perfect I think make him a person that is wise.

Wise (wo)men badge:
What makes a person wise?
  1. Their thoughts transcend the everyday, mundane tasks of man, often branching into a category of philosophy.
  2. At the same time, a wise person should share those thoughts with his or her fellow man, because if they don't share their wise thoughts how would anyone ever know that they are wise?
  3. Their ideas challenge the norm, often going against common ways of thinking.
  4. They need to have life experience. In other words, I think for a person to be considered 'wise' they have to have experienced pain, loss, suffering, responsibility, being insulted or harmed and things of that nature as well as happiness. So anyone who hasn't experienced all those things, to me, can't be wise because they can't wake well-rounded judgments about how life is if they know nothing about the other, less pleasant half of it. (Note, this does not exclude young people. Children can go through all of those things and be wise, and so too can teenagers. The difference isn't age, but rather experience.)
  5. Something also must be said about the character of a wise person. A wise person can't be demeaning towards other people, but instead be open minded and be aware of differences in opinion.
  6. A wise person has their actions go along with their words. Some people like to preach about the way things need to be done, or how things should be run instead to make things better for everyone. But if then that person doesn't live up to what they claim are the proper terms for conduct, that person goes from being wise to a hypocrite. Think of Henry David Thoreau, who had his opposing views about society and was said "this is the way a man ought to be living", and then he put his money where his mouth was, went out and lived that way.
  7. A wise person is someone who respects life and forms of life. They understand what acts constitute as "wickedness" and admonish their fellows against such acts.
  8. A wise person has patience, and understands that simply because things are obvious to them they might not be as obvious to others.
  9. A wise person must show restraint. They know which battles are worth fighting and when they do choose to engaging in argumentation they're not quick to get angry because they would know that differences in ideas and arguing is just an opportunity to view a subject from a different perspective, and shouldn't be counted as an insult against their character.
  10. Finally, a wise person will never think that they know the answer to everything. They would be the last persons to call themselves wise because they know that there is always something to be learned.

One wise person that I like who fits in with these characteristics is Confucius. One of my favorite quote from his teachings is his opinion about education: "He who learns but does not think, is lost. He who thinks but does not learn is in great danger".

Some excellent examples of wise (wo)men include:


  1. Obi-wan Kenobi (Episodes IV, V and VI): Obi wan is wise because he understands the intellectual, mystic realm of the force and how to use its mysterious power. He also is patient went teaching Luke, and the fact that he has taken on pupils shows that he is willing to share what he has learned. He's also gone through many hardships (that I assume have happened in the first three episodes, I never got around to watching them), and isn't quick to anger or fear. Obi wan knows when to play a jedi mind trick on Imperial guards and when to fight people off physically.
  2. Jesus: Jesus is wise because he shared his thoughts about the love of God and the love people should have for each other,there by wanting to improve people's lives by giving moral advice about how to conduct oneself. Despite some of the disagreeable things Jesus witnessed (such as the almost-stoning of Mary Magdalene) he used words and arguments (not violence) to persuade people to see how their behaviors were wrong. Jesus practiced what he preached and was only moved to extreme anger one time when people made a market inside a temple and were gambling on the Sabbath.
  3. Socrates: Socrates was wise because he had thoughts that transcended the everyday thoughts of regular people. He argued for his ideas and maintained them as correct even with the steep resistance he met from his peers.
  4. Buddha: Buddha can be considered wise because not only did he practice what he preached but he also turned down entering Nirvana so that he could stay behind and help other people reach enlightenment. Such a self sacrifice on behalf of the well-being for his fellow man to me makes Buddha very wise and compassionate. Buddha also had great patience when dealing with his pupils.
  5. Tony Clarke - The man who saved "The Resurrection": I believe this man to possess wisdom (if only to a very shallow degree) because he had the foresight to see the importance of this work of art to a culture and know that importance meant more to the world than his own life. Him having the courage to follow through with what was right makes him wise in that sense.
  6. Confucius: As I've stated before, I find Confucius to be a wise person. In reference to the quotation I selected above, Confucius is sharing his intellectual thoughts with his fellows so that he can give them advice about how to improve their lives. Confucius also follows/lives by his own advice by setting an example of being a thinker that reflects on what he's learned.
  7. The Alchemist - Paulo Coelho: In his novel The Alchemist the character named Santiago goes out searching for a great treasure, and along the way learns about his place in the universe. During his stay in an oasis city, Santiago searches for a man who is simply called the alchemist. Santiago eventually meets him and the alchemist is very wise. He is in tune with the energy connecting all living things and can tune in to that energy to see visions of the future and read the intentions of other people. He teaches Santiago his ways and once he feels that Santiago has learned enough he sends him on his way.
  8. Prospero - Shakespeare's Tempest: Prospero is a wise person because not only is he very educated, but even though he had misgivings about the way Alonso and Antonio usurped him out of his dukedom in Milan, he still doesn't let his anger sway him to retaliate violently when they shipwreck on to his island. And he also doesn't let his personal feelings get in the way of Ferdinand and Meranda's love for each other. Being smart, knowing which battles to choose, and not being hasty to violence make a person wise.
  9. Muhammad: Muhammad is wise because he had intellectual thoughts that he shared with his fellow man to help them live a moral and meaningful life.
  10. Maurie Schwartz - Tuesdays with Maurie: I think Maurie is wise because he's had enough experiences that are bad as well as good ones. Towards the end of his life he did a lot of reflecting and had time to think about what events should really be meaningful to a person, and walked people through his experience of dying so that those who face that last challenge (as we all inevitably will) know that they aren't alone and give them hope. In this way, Maurie's willingness to share what he's learned, his life experiences, and his understanding that he isn't perfect I think make him a person that is wise.


Medieval Studies Workshop Extra credit:

I had a really good time at the medieval studies workshop. During my time there I learned a lot of fascinating things about this time period, and even made some professional connections with high school teachers (which is what I'm studying to become). I took a lot of notes on the things I observed:

  1. Learning to Die in London: The first thing to happen was a guest presenter talking about her newly published work Learning to Die in London by Amy Appleford. She talked about the Book of Hours which was a text that told monks and nuns what to sing/pray at the various times of the day, so it was a life guide essentially. This book and another text called The Office of the Dead (which has 9 lessons) were books that helped prepare people for the physical/mental deteriorating period before death. In short, Appleford's work focuses on texts that tell common people back in the day how to prepare to die in a religious way.

  2. Them Monks Can Sing!: After this I attended a workshop on medieval music because I had absolutely no knowledge on anything like that so I thought there was the greatest opportunity for me to learn something new. Dr. Sewright was the presenter for this session and she did a fabulous job at teaching us about the music of that time period. One thing she emphasized, and that I was not surprised to hear, was that religion greatly influenced everything the people did back then, and music was no different. She showed us the evolution of ecclesiastical music, from one chorus of monks singing one line of music, to several choruses of monks singing many lines at once. One song she showed as was Viderunt Omnes. This song evolved along with the development of different music notations, and the monks in the Notre Dame cathedral specifically invented a very long version of Viderunt Omnes just to be sung in the cathedral. Dr. Sewright played us some excerpts of the songs from youtube and they sounded beautiful. But I knew that it was far from the true experience. A whole choir of monks with their free flowing tones, reverberating off the stone vaults and stained glass panels of the cathedral would have completely immobilized a person with sheer veneration for their faith. Again, the recording playing through the youtube video didn't come close to this experience, but it helped me to imagine what it must have been like, and that was exciting. She also played for us Sumer Is Icumen In which might be my new favorite folk song.

  3. 'Tis but a flesh wound: The last, and arguably the most entertaining, session that I participated in was a presentation from the Worcester Art Museum called Knight's Tale: Arms and Armor. This session was a detailed presentation about the evolution of classical and medieval armor. One thing I learned from this presentation was how old chain mail armor was. Apparently soldiers were wearing it back in the Roman days, and every soldier including the foot soldiers was required to wear it. The word for this type of armor, 'mail', actually comes from old French and means 'woven mesh'. Knights weren't the only ones to use mail covered items: fish mongers and butchers of the time had mail gloves so that they could do their jobs more efficiently. From there the presentation walked us through the progression of more sophisticated armor, finally arriving at the shining metal carapaces we usually think of when we think of a knight. My favorite part was when he talked about shields (because I've always been more of a defensive person myself) and when the presenter briefly talked about the conditioning of war horses.

Lysistrata Badge:

To my fellow Athenian, Lord Magistrate,

First, let me apologize for my cohort's previous behavior. I realize now, after having time to calmly reflect upon the situation, that forcing you into women's clothing was perhaps not our best persuasive tactic ever. Nevertheless, the situation between Sparta and Athens has yet to change, and so my women and I will not change our stance either. We mean it when we say no intimacy whatsoever. We shall continue to hold this stance firm until our demands are met which, for you as well as the other men's convenience, I've detailed below:

  • Peace Negotiation: Representatives from Sparta and Athens must meet to negotiate peace. Please note that simply getting together with the pretense to talk about peace only to get no where will not lift our no-sex ban. You must meet, discuss, and then come to terms of peace and swear on them.

  • Apologies: You men have been nothing but vicious to us throughout this whole ordeal: trying to smoke us out of the Capitol, some of my sisters have even been burned at the stake for the simple refusal of sex. Therefore, we only ask that those who have committed violent crimes against women to be tried and punished like any normal criminal; and we want written apologies from the chorus of old men who belittled and demeaned us (you know whom I'm speaking of).

  • Acknowledgement: Lastly, we want one day dedicated to women after the peace treaty is signed that celebrates everything we do. Before you launch on a sexist argument that women don't do anything, need I remind you of how all your homes and lives fell apart without 'your women' taking care of all the things we 'don't do'. Men are often celebrated when they come home successful from war, isn't that right? Why don't women also get a day to celebrate all they've done in men's absence, and what we have done to support the country while they are gone? If not a separate day, then at least include us in part of the men's celebration. We deserve to be acknowledged too.

These are our demands. The terms of the last two demands may be negotiated but we are absolutely firm on the first one. We will not desist until our first demand is completely satisfied. I'm looking forward to your timely response so that we can begin our journey to Athen's golden age once more.

- Sincerely, Lysistrata

Rewrite of one of the scenes:

*setting: Sparta's akropolis with congregation of women

Lampito: Gosh dang it, where is dat Lysistrata? I called fer duh meeting of duh women this morn and she still ain't here. If she's fer duh peace like she says she is she better show up.

Corinthian girl: Don't worry, Lampito. She'll show

*Enter Lysistrata with Myrrhine and Calonice

Lysistrata: Lampito! We're here, sorry to keep you waiting. We're very eager to hear about your plan for peace.

Lampito: Sure ting. But first, lemme ask you dis one thing: Aren't you all fed up wit duh fact our men ain't never home?

All: Yes!

Lampito: Dis dumb war has gone on way too long.

Lysistrata: What's your plan?

Lampito: I do have one, and I tink it'll work really well. Are you all ready to hear it? It ain't for the faint of heart.

Corinthian girl: Tell us, I'll do anything, even if it means my life!

Myrrhine: I'd be willing to cut myself in half and sell my body like a fish.

Lampito: Aw'right, if yer all so adamant about it, here's what we'll do: We gottah not make the sexy time happen until the men promise duh peace.

Corinthian girl: Nope.

Myrrhine: Count me out.

Lampito: Really you guys! C'mon! Didn't ya jus say you were willin' to cut yerself in half over there??

Myrrhine: Yeah but...the d tho?

Lampito: Lysistrata, most purdy and wise of all duh Athen women, you have tuh see the importance of my plan, don't you? Back me up on this!

Lysistrata: Hnnn....wow...there's no telling how long we'll have to abstain for, but..you're right, it's for the sake of peace. I beleive we should-no, that we must do this plan.

Lampito: Finally! A woman dat has some sense in her purdy head!


external image LysOldMen.jpg
Above, Lysistrata and her women confront the chorus of old men outside the Akropolis.

Chaucer Badge:

1) The Queen's decision

The court scribe closed the scroll he had been reading from.
"Your majesty, you've heard all the evidence. What is your will concerning this man's sentence?"
"Hnnn..." King Arthur stroked his beard as he pondered. "I'm pretty sure our law says execution is the punishment for rape. So I guess we'll go with that?"
There came a gentle voice from his side.
"My most dearest king..."
"Hm? Oh, yes my queen, do you have something you'd like to add to his sentence?"
"Rather, if it pleases you, may you leave the matter of this man's sentence to me and my women?"
King Aurthur stared at his queen, completely confused.
"Err...really? You want to? I mean, sure, that's all fine, but why?"
"Well, I for one don't think the punishment doesn't benefit anyone."
King Arthur stared at her blankly. "Why...my radiant queen, what else did you have in mind? Ah, perhaps are you saying the punishment is not humiliating enough?
Shall I have him dragged through the kingdom from our chariots before his execution?"
"No, I don't mean that. Rather, what I mean is I think we should not waste this opportunity to make a didactic example of him for other men who might have similar tendencies."
King Arthur conspicuously checked his pocket dictionary for the didactic's entry before he offered his rebuttle.
"I shall leave this matter entirely to you and your ladies, my queen. His life is in your hands."
"Thank you." The queen then turned her shining eyes on to the bent head of the former knight. King Arthur, no longer needing to be present, promptly left to get more mutton.
"Sir Ditamus," The queen began. "It seems to me you don't understand what it feels like to be completely powerless and have someone painfully have their way with your body."
Shamelessly, the warrior spoke out against his queen.
"But I do, your majesty. In war your foes will pin you down and do all sorts of things to you with the intent to kill. And yes, there are some that drag this out unnecessarily for the pleasure they get from it."
The noble queen took a calming breath through her nostrils.
"Did this young maiden make advances as if to kill you that night when her rape happened?"
Suddenly silent, the soldier glared off to the side of the room.
"You know as well as I that this woman was not the same as your vicious foes on the battle field. You were like a hungry hound, and her a helpless rabbit. Do not try to compare this to something that does not make sense. Your insolence in response to my mercy to spare your life does not help you any in my reconsideration of your sentence."
"Forgive me, my queen..." The knight mumbled, utterly miserable. "I am a wretch most insufferable."
"That you are, but as I said before, I feel that we have an opportunity to rehabilitate you and provide an example to other men in the process. Here is what you must do: From this day forward you must wear a big red R on your tunic over your chain mail and when people ask about it you must tell them the truth, that the R stands for 'rapist' and you must complete 100 hours of community service at the battered women shelter in the capital. Lastly, once you have completed those hours you must write an epic poem reflecting the lessons you've learned about human rights. This is the punishment I assign to you in place of the death penalty. So let it be written in the records, so let it be done!"

2) Malyne's Testimony

"And now, I'd like to call the last witness to the stand: Malyne, the Miller's daughter. Miss Malyne, do you swear to tell the whole truth, so help you God?""I do.""Very well then. Miss Malyne, can you tell us if you recognize the two defendants?" The defense lawyer gestured to the two students, Allen and John, sitting at the desk.Malyne's mouth quirked into a playful smile and she nodded towards them."Yes, I recognize them all right."Malyne sent Allen a wink and he gave one back."Very good. Now then, the best you can, would you mind telling the jury what happened the night the defendants stayed with you and your parents?""Well, they were doing some business with my father earlier that day and it ran very late, so they stayed the night with us. We all slept in the same room that night...well, sort of: my father made me sleep in this wardrobe thing that night.""Why was that? Why did he have you do that?"Malyne shrugged. "Probably because he didn't trust those students around me. He locked the doors to the wardrobe and slid the key under the doors to me.""Mhmmm, and then what happened?""Everyone went to bed. It was around 1 or 2 o'clock that I heard someone tapping on the wardrobe doors. It was Allen, he asked me to open the doors.""And did you?""Not at first. I wanted to see what he wanted before I opened them.""And what did he say when you asked him?"Malyne fanned herself as a little bit of color flushed her cheeks."Well he was very forward about it. To be frank, he said he wanted to have sex with me."A surprised murmur ran through the jury."I see," the defense lawyer continued. "So what happened then?""I..." Malyne smiled sheepishly and scratched the back of her head. "Well he was a good looking guy so I thought 'why not?' I slid him the key under my door and he crawled in and..." Her sentence trailed off, hoping the jury would be able to put two and two together."Were Mr. Allen's advances toward you at all malicious, violent, or unwanted on your part?"Malyne shook her head. "No, not at all. I'm the one who slipped him the key. If I didn't want what he was selling I could have easily told him to bugger off. And he was very sweet and tender to me the whole night."Malyne held up her hand in the shape of a phone and mouthed the words 'call me' to Allen."Thank you, Miss Maylne. I would like to move on to another thing that happened that night. Is true that these two students stole a cake from your father?""Oh, yeah. That's probably true. But to be honest, my dad's been stealing from everyone for years and everyone in town knows it, so I honestly don't even feel like pressing charges about that. He deserved it if you ask me.""It doesn't sound like you think very highly of your father, Miss Malyne...""Uhhh...have you met my dad? He's not exactly the best person in the world""Malyne!" Her mother hissed in a horrified whisper from the benches. "That is your father you're talking about!""The defense has no further questions at this time, your honor. The prosecution may now proceed with their questions."
3) A Princess's DiaryToday has been a roller coaster of emotions. After living happily in my mother's kingdom of Bologna for eleven happy years, suddenly a herald comes to our palace and says that I'm to marry this man from Salucia. Well, I shouldn't phrase it quite like that. It's not as if he's just any man, he's the king of Salucia but...still...Even though I'm still young and don't really understand these affairs too much, I happen to believe I'm too young to be married yet! What's more, this Salucian king is so old! He's old enough to be my dad! But I think the most disturbing thing about all of this is that my mother is okay with this. When the herald showed up and delivered his message, I had confidence that my mother would dismiss it or at the very least promise a marriage for when I became of age. But no, she had my things packed up immediately and ordered me away without so much as a good bye. I've never been so hurt or confused in my entire life. But I should have anticipated something like this should befall me one day...It's the duty of the eldest daughter to marry in a strategic like manner...but I didn't think my mother would have reduced me to a lot like this. All I can hope is that this man will be nice to me.
I've heard horrible rumors about this man, that he murders his own children and things like that. Oh no, I can't even think about what might happen to me, I'll start crying and surely I'm going to lose it. I guess the only good thing to come out of this is that my brother was spared a fate like this and was able to stay behind safe and happy in our home kingdom. How nice it must be to be born male and have the right to marry who you want or cut off ties with your family. I must try to stay positive and endure this fate with the same dignity my mother taught me befits a princess, but god help me I just don't know if I can do that, I've never been tested like this before.


Katabasis Badge:

What does katabasis mean?
After consulting a few different pages on the internet it seems to me that the word Katabasis means a movement of some kind, either from a high to low place or from inland to the coast of a country.
What underworld I'd like to visit:
Truth be told I wouldn't like to visit any type of underworld if I didn't absolutely have to. But if I had to choose I guess the underworld from Greek mythology because this type of underworld has good and bad places, so there are terrible places for people to be tortured for all eternity but I know there are also places that are paradises, like Elysium, so I wouldn't mind going there. Another reason why I might want to go to the Greek underworld is because from reading classical stories I know there's always an opportunity to come back from the underworld, such as in the original story about Orpheus and Eurydice.
Image of underworld:

external image elysium.jpg

Here is depicted the Elysian fields, this is the place where distinguished people went after they died, so like Hercules or Percy, other heros and demigods. This is a paradise where none of the souls would have to work.